28 - 30 August, 2018
Hilton London Olympia , London, United Kingdom

Conference Day Two: Technical Day

8:00 am - 8:45 am COFFEE AND NETWORKING

8:45 am - 9:00 am CHAIRMAN'S OPENING REMARKS

  • Reporting on the progress of the IMO’s regulatory scoping exercise
  • To what extent does the existing regulatory framework need to be amended to enable safe, secure and environmental operation of Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS)?
  • Establishing a timeline for increased automation; decision-support versus decision-outsourcing
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Mr Ringo Lakeman

Directorate for Maritime Affairs/Chair, NCSR Committee
Netherlands Ministry of Infrastructure & Water Management/IMO

9:40 am - 10:20 am SMART DECISIONS FOR A DIGITAL FUTURE: DEFINING EUROPE’S COLLABORATIVE APPROACH TO SMART SEA FREIGHT

Mr Markku Mylly - Executive Director EMSA
  • Leveraging Europe’s space-based capability to support ship-shore communications
  • The nexus between automation and safety. Enabling operators to take smarter decisions that increase efficiency and decrease the risk of accident 
  • The fuel problem: pioneering clean solutions to lessen the environmental impact of cargo ships, and automating on-board processes to lessen consumption
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Mr Markku Mylly

Executive Director
EMSA

10:20 am - 11:00 am THE STATE OF THE MARKET: DEFINING THE PATH TO AUTOMATION FOR GLOBAL SHIPPING

Captain John Lloyd (Or Alternative Representative) - CEO The Nautical Institute
  • To what extent is maritime technology able to propose effective solutions which can support enhanced navigation and operation for sea freight?
  • Delivering effective partnerships between digital industry and ship operators to support innovation
  • Exploring how the training and expertise of crews should be affected by the onset of digitised shipping
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Captain John Lloyd (Or Alternative Representative)

CEO
The Nautical Institute

11:00 am - 11:30 am MORNING COFFEE AND NETWORKING

11:30 am - 12:10 pm E-NAVIGATION’S ROLE IN IMPROVING SAFE NAVIGATION

Mr Francis Zachariae - Secretary General IALA
  • Consolidating multiple data systems to deliver navigational safety for cargo ships
  • Assessing the risk of human error as a factor in shipping accidents, and upscaling the decision-support capabilities of automated navigation tools
  • The prospects of delivering a globally standardised e-navigation concept which would streamline global sea freight operations
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Mr Francis Zachariae

Secretary General
IALA

12:10 pm - 12:50 pm A VISION FOR THE FUTURE: DELIVERING THE ONE SEA ECOSYSTEM

Päivi Haikkola - Ecosystem Lead DIMECC
  • Developing a commercial autonomous shipping ecosystem in the Baltic Sea by 2025
  • Creating a smart environment to support effective decision-making for the maritime operator. 
  • Exploiting the benefits of big data, AI and ship-shore connectivity to improve navigational safety and operational delivery. Using technology to enhance the ways in which routes and operations are planned
  • Delivering connectivity for the whole fleet
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Päivi Haikkola

Ecosystem Lead
DIMECC

12:20 pm - 2:00 pm NETWORKING LUNCH

2:00 pm - 2:40 pm DELIVERING A TECHNICAL ARCHITECTURE FOR DIGITISATION

Svein Medhaug - Senior Engineer Norwegian Maritime Authority
  • Assessing the merits of IOT technology as a means to link-up vessels and ports. Is the distributed nature of sea freight a barrier to enhanced data fusion?
  • Working towards the harmonised display of navigation information to support improved decision-making for the vessel crew
  • The Norwegian experience of developing autonomous and remote-controlled vessels for short-haul. Overcoming legislative and technical obstructions to automation, and applying that model to longer-haul freight
  • Digitisation's impact on energy efficiency. How can technology support a cleaner marine sector?
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Svein Medhaug

Senior Engineer
Norwegian Maritime Authority

One of the challenges facing shipping today, & even more in the future, is to manage the bureaucracy involved in everyday shipping activities, be it the reporting formalities when a ship calls at the port or the certificates the ship has to present to prove her seaworthiness and competence of her crew. Should we move one step further from digitalized (pdf) certificates and explore the possibilities of reusing the data? Should we abandon the certificates as entities altogether and switch to the concept of just presenting the proof of seaworthiness? What benefits would it bring to the shipping companies and shipping industry as a whole? We must also keep in mind the aspect of unmanned ships coming into use in the near future – there will be no one on board to hand over the certificates to the inspector or to report to port authorities. The Estonian Maritime Administration is trying to answer these questions and is glad to share its vision of the future digitalization path to follow as well as give practical examples of in which areas we have switched to full data sharing already or piloting new concepts.
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Eero Naaber

Head of Development and Innovation
Estonian Maritime Administration

3:20 pm - 3:50 pm AFTERNOON TEA AND NETWORKING

3:50 pm - 4:30 pm AUTOMATING THE ENGINE ROOM TO IMPROVE MAINTENANCE AND SUSTAINMENT

Professor Gordon Meadow - Principal Investigator, Project IMAGINE Southampton Solent University
  • Performing typical maintenance operations remotely to support continuous vessel operation
  • How might enhanced status monitoring support a predictive approach to vessel maintenance?
  • Avoiding a just-in-time approach for the future fleet
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Professor Gordon Meadow

Principal Investigator, Project IMAGINE
Southampton Solent University

4:30 pm - 5:10 pm MARITIME DATA SPACE: DISTRIBUTING DATA WHILE KEEPING THE OWNER'S CONTROL

Ørnulf Jan Rødseth - Senior Research Scientist SINTEF Ocean A/S
Based on the Industry 4.0 "Industrial Data Space" (IDS) concept, we are now investigating how this technology can be applied in the maritime domain. IDS allows information to reside in different physical databases while the owner of the data still has full control of who is allowed to access and use the data. This could be a transparent and efficient solution to the problem of having several service providers operating on different information from different sources, e.g. for benchmarking or in logistics operations, while still retaining strict control over who are allowed to access the information. Thus, an engine manufacturer could locally collect and aggregate data from several different ship owners' installations for technical improvement purposes, while the individual ship owners still can control who else gets access to the information,  regardless of where the information is stored.
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Ørnulf Jan Rødseth

Senior Research Scientist
SINTEF Ocean A/S

5:10 pm - 5:20 pm CLOSE OF CONFERENCE